UMD: A Globally Connected University

Jason Abramowitz

Term: Summer 2016
 
The study abroad program impacted my life on multiple levels. Professionally, I've learned and seen first hand how people from different backgrounds try to come up with solutions to complex problems. I've also networked both locally and internationally - from other fellow students to professional architects and engineers. Personally, I've become much more outgoing and even adventurous.  
 
Advice for future #TerpsAbroad: Having a disability doesn't exclude you from the same experiences your peers enjoy. It's totally doable and people are willing to help you get what you need. I think if I can do it, then anyone can. You learn so much about yourself.
 
Coming in, I had no idea what to expect as I had never been so far away from my home.  I'm a very internal person and approach new people, especially from different cultures, very seldom. Living in new place was the biggest concern I had during my time in a foreign country. Being person with a disability and using a wheelchair, I have to take extra precautions on accessibility. To my surprise, the accessibility where I was staying was excellent and the people were more than happy to help. Strangers off the street would assist me with navigating the public transportation. The other participants and local students helped me out and treated me like anyone else, and we became friends.
 
Advice for future #TerpsAbroad: [Studying abroad] is a must do, at least once. It's important to see other cultures and how they do things. It is a great perspective and learning experience.