UMD: A Globally Connected University

Spring 2018 - HONR269T: Honors Seminar: Understanding U.S. Foreign Policy toward Afghanistan

HONR 269T: Honors Seminar: Understanding U.S. Foreign Policy toward Afghanistan

Time: Th 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Location: ANA 0120

Instructor: Temim Nusraty

Credits: 3

Partner Institution: American University of Afghanistan, Afghanistan
Register on Testudo

 

Course Description: Afghanistan has been at the center of U.S. and international attention since September 11. This seminar will examine the development and evolution of U.S. policy toward Afghanistan, including the impact of the death of Osama bin Laden on the U.S. strategy. This seminar will also examine the history of Afghanistan and its political figures. In addition, the seminar will explore the current challenges facing Afghanistan such as weak governance, widespread poverty, pervasive corruption, the burgeoning narcotics problem, and lack of respect for the rule of law. Students will also have the opportunity to hear different perspectives on the conflict in Afghanistan from current and former senior officials in the U.S. Government. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to engage with undergraduates studying in Afghanistan to better understand the indigenous perspective on the war and the U.S. presence in Afghanistan.

 

This is a Global Classroom course. There will be approximately 4 or 5 weeks where this course will meet on Sundays for teleconferencing meetings with students in Kabul, Afghanistan instead of meeting at its normal weekly time on Thursday nights.

 

Award Year: 2014
Name of Faculty: William Dorland

​Tilte and Affiliation: Executive Director, University Honors College
Title of Proposed Course: Understanding U.S. Foreign Policy Towards Afghanistan
Partner Institution: American University of Afghanistan, Afghanistan

 

This course will wed traditional “role playing” pedagogy with the latest learning technologies.  UMD Honors students and peers at the American University of Afghanistan in Kabul will jointly re-examine both the longer and more recent history of Afghanistan.  Working in teams of four—two students from UMD, two from AUAf—participants will then prepare for and re-enact the “Bonn Conference” of December 2001, where US, UN, Afghan and other world leaders came together and made pivotal decisions affecting the country’s future.  To better understand the interests and policies of the various stakeholders, students at UMD and AUAF will hear different perspectives on the conflict in Afghanistan since 2001 from former senior U.S. and Afghan government officials.  Against this backdrop and informed by the lessons learned over the past 12 years, each team will represent a country and/or organization and advocate for a particular course of action the team feels will advance that country's or organization's interest.​