UMD: A Globally Connected University

New COVID-19 International Travel Restrictions

New COVID-19 International Travel Restrictions

On January 25, 2021, President Biden signed a new proclamation that has potential impact on the students, scholars and faculty served by the University of Maryland’s Office of International Student & Scholar Services (ISSS). This email provides information regarding the “Proclamation on the Suspension of Entry as Immigrants and Non-Immigrants of Certain Additional Persons Who Pose a Risk of Transmitting Coronavirus Disease” (available here). The attached Q&A answers specifics on how this news may impact members of the UMD community.

We understand the difficulty this causes those affected by the proclamation, and ISSS is ready and available to support you in these difficult times. If you have additional questions regarding the proclamation’s impact on you, ISSS offers chats and appointments with our advisors.

International students, scholars and faculty who were expected on campus that are not able to return due to the recent proclamation should inform their academic department or hiring manager of their delay. International Student & Scholar Services will work with affected individuals to update immigration documents as required.

Please visit isss.umd.edu for more information.

Sincerely,

The Office of International Student & Scholar Services

____________

Q&A: New COVID-19 international travel restrictions announced January 25, 2021

Who is affected by the Presidential Proclamation?

Noncitizens of the U.S. who were physically present within the Schengen Area, the United Kingdom (excluding overseas territories outside of Europe), Ireland, South Africa and Brazil during the 14-day period preceding their entry into the United States. This condition on entry applies to both immigrants and nonimmigrants attempting to enter the U.S.

The proclamation limits entry for many visa categories. Of special note to the University of Maryland community, F1/F2, J1/J2, H1/H4, O1 and TN visa holders are included in the travel restrictions. ISSS intends to continue to process visa requests from departments for faculty for the academic year 2021-2022.

Who is not affected by the Presidential Proclamation?

  • any lawful permanent resident of the United States;
  • any noncitizen national of the United States;
  • any noncitizen who is the spouse of a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident;
  • any noncitizen who is the parent or legal guardian of a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident, provided that the U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident is unmarried and under the age of 21;
  • any noncitizen who is the sibling of a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident, provided that both are unmarried and under the age of 21;
  • any noncitizen who is the child, foster child, or ward of a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident, or who is a prospective adoptee seeking to enter the United States pursuant to the IR-4 or IH-4 visa classifications;
  • any noncitizen traveling at the invitation of the United States Government for a purpose related to containment or mitigation of the virus;
  • any noncitizen traveling as a nonimmigrant pursuant to a C-1, D, or C-1/D nonimmigrant visa as a crewmember or any noncitizen otherwise traveling to the United States as air or sea crew;
  • any noncitizen who is:
    (A) seeking entry into or transiting the United States pursuant to one of the following visas: A-1, A-2, C-2, C-3 (as a foreign government official or immediate family member of an official), E-1 (as an employee of TECRO or TECO or the employee’s immediate family members), G-1, G-2, G-3, G-4, NATO-1 through NATO-4, or NATO-6 (or seeking to enter as a nonimmigrant in one of those NATO categories); or
    (B) whose travel falls within the scope of section 11 of the United Nations Headquarters Agreement;
  • any noncitizen who is a member of the U.S. Armed Forces and any noncitizen who is a spouse or child of a member of the U.S. Armed Forces;
  • any noncitizen whose entry would further important United States law enforcement objectives, as determined by the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Homeland Security, or their respective designees, based on a recommendation of the Attorney General or his designee; or
  • any noncitizen whose entry would be in the national interest, as determined by the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Homeland Security, or their designees.

When does the Presidential Proclamation take effect?

The proclamation takes effect at 12:01 a.m. Eastern Standard Time on January 26, 2021, for noncitizens of the U.S. who were physically present within the Schengen Area, the United Kingdom (excluding overseas territories outside of Europe), Ireland, and Brazil during the 14-day period preceding their entry into the United States.

At 12:01 a.m. Eastern Standard Time on January 30, 2021, it takes effect for noncitizens of the U.S. who were physically present within South Africa during the 14-day period preceding their entry into the United States.

How long is the Proclamation in effect?

The proclamation is in effect until it is terminated by the President of the United States. The Secretary of Health and Human Services may recommend to the President that the proclamation be terminated, modified or needs to continue on a monthly schedule.